How to Tie a Fishing Line on a Cane Pole

How to Tie a Fishing Line on a Cane Pole
How to Tie a Fishing Line on a Cane Pole
Cane poles conjure up memories of lazy afternoons spent on the river bank, watching the brightly colored bobber for signs that a fish is nosing about your bait. Properly rigged, the humble cane pole, in the hands of an experienced fisherman, is one of the most effective fish-catching instruments to come along.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy
Things You'll Need:
  • Bamboo fishing pole Monofilament fishing line 1 ounce fishing weight Hooks Split shot or lead sinker Plastic float or styrofoam or cork bobber Bait
  • Bamboo fishing pole
  • Monofilament fishing line
  • 1 ounce fishing weight
  • Hooks
  • Split shot or lead sinker
  • Plastic float or styrofoam or cork bobber
  • Bait
Step 1

Choose a pole that is 8 to 10 feet long and about 3/4 inch in diameter at the base and 1/4 inch wide at the tip. The pole should have plenty of flex for setting the hook and flipping the fish out onto the bank. Test the pole by grabbing it near the base and whipping it back and forth. Watch for any visible cracks or breaks. The best poles are straight near the tip, solid at the base and whippy through the upper length of the pole.

Step 2

Tie the line around the base and wind it up the pole toward the tip. Tie a half hitch between the two cane "joints" a foot or so from the tip and leave enough line to almost reach back to the base of the pole. The correct "rig" for a bamboo pole is a piece of clear fishing line that's just a few inches shorter than your pole. Leave extra loops of line around the pole in case you break your line on a snag or a big fish snaps it off. If needed, unroll the extra line and tie a new hook on. To secure the line at the tip, wrap a bit of duct tape or electrical tape around it. A couple of pieces of tape along the pole will keep the line from creeping. Tie the line to the base with a simple overhand knot. By wrapping the line around the pole, you won't lose your line in case you accidentally break the pole while landing a big one. Adjust the line length by simply rolling the line up to shorten it and unrolling it to lengthen the line again.

Step 3

Tie a fishhook to the business end of the line. Choose a fishhook that is the right size for whatever size fish swim in your fishing hole. Go up above the hook 6 inches and clip on a small split shot or tie on a lead sinker.

Step 4

Attach a float or "bobber." The hook, bait and sinker are suspended below the float. When a fish comes along and bites the hook, the float bobs up and down and alerts you to the presence of an interested fish. Attach the bobber so the hook hangs as far below the water as you want the bait to hang.

Step 5

Bait the hook with your bait of choice. The standard nightcrawler or other flavors of earthworm work well as do crickets and minnows. Drop the hook and sinker into your favorite spot and simply watch the "bobber." When a fish grabs the bait, it will pull the float downward, causing it to bob. Give the pole a sharp tug to set the hook and lift the fish to the surface.

Resources
Tom King published his first paid story in 1976. His book, "Going for the Green: An Insider's Guide to Raising Money With Charity Golf," was published in 2008. He received gold awards for screenwriting at the 1994 Worldfest Charleston and 1995 Worldfest Houston International Film Festivals. King holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Southwestern Adventist College.
fishing poles image by Scott McCarty from Fotolia.com