The History of the Pyramids of Giza

Long regarded as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Pyramids of Giza remain to draw tourists, archaeologists and historians from all over the world. There have been approximately 80 pyramids identified in Egypt, and several are at Giza. However, when experts and locals talk of the Pyramids of Giza, they are typically referring to the pyramids known as the Great Pyramid, the Pyramid of Khafre and the Pyramid of Menkaure. The history of the Pyramids of Giza has long been disputed and is still being studied today.
Construction

Although for many years it was believed that slaves built the Pyramids at Giza, further research has revealed that the pyramids were actually built by villagers who were monitored by the pharaoh's men. The pyramids are named by the pharaohs who built them.

Time

An estimated 20,000 to 30,000 Egyptians took approximately 80 years to build the Pyramids at Giza.

Location

Priests and astronomers aided in choosing sites for the pyramids so their axes lined up with certain constellations in the sky.

The Great Pyramid

The Great Pyramid was built by Pharaoh Khufu around 2550 B.C. It has three burial chambers inside which are connected by passages.

Pyramid of Khafre

Pharaoh Khafre, Khufu's son, built this pyramid to rival his father's. It was erected circa 2520 B.C. The Pyramid of Khafre is also known as the home of the Sphinx, which shows the head of the Pharaoh on the body of a lion.

Pyramid of Menkaure

The Pyramid of Menkaure is known as the last of the Great Pyramids of Giza and is one-tenth the size of the Great Pyramid. Pharaoh Menkaure constructed the lower levels of his pyramid out of granite. Due to his sudden death, it is believed that his successor actually finished the pyramid.

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Jessica Morelock began her professional writing career in 2007, after a three-year stint as a producer and co-host on Sirius Satellite Radio. She has also worked for the airline industry and as a travel agent. She completed a bachelor's degree in political science at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.